Pick a subject in the menu to the right and click the question to reveal its answer. If you cannot find the answer to your question within this FAQ, feel free to contact us via technical support, or give us a call at 504.529.1413.


Programming CBAS

How do I change user permissions in CBAS?
Select ‘Program Passwords’ from the System Menu . Next select ‘Edit’ then click the user name for which you wish to change permissions.
How do I add a User/Password in CBAS?
To add a User/Password or to change the permissions for a user select ‘Program Passwords’ from the Software drop menu. You can then edit an existing user or add a new one. In order to add a new user select insert and place the cursor (a red line will appear) above any existing user in the list.

Note:If you select an empty line, insert will not work.

How does adaptive optimal start work?
When you check the box to “Allow OPTIMAL START to ADAPTIVELY adjust the Cooling and Heating Slope,” CBAS will save several parameters about the last 16 Heating and 16 Cooling Optimal Starts. The parameters saved are:

  1. Slope
  2. What the temperature difference was when the Optimal Start began.
  3. How long before the Schedule Start time did the Optimal Start begin. (Actually not stored but can be calculated from A and B above)
  4. Did the Optimal start reach it’s goal? If not, then what was the temperature difference at schedule start time?
  5. The day the Optimal Start ran.
  6. Was the unit off for more than 36 Hours when the Optimal Start first evaluated? (Tells you if it was after a Holiday or a Monday)

You can click on the “Show Adaptive History” button to see the data on the above parameters. Once you have enabled Adaptive Optimal Start, CBAS will determine the “slope”, or amount of time required to change the temperature by 1 degree, and adjust on a daily basis.

The following applies to versions prior to 3.1.6:

How does adaptive optimal start work?

Once these points are programmed, go to the Point Program Screen of the point containing the AHU schedule. Click the Program Optimal Start button to get the setup screen. (Pre-3.1.6 screen shown)

Click on the buttons next to Analog Input, Low Setpoint, and High Setpoint, and then select the appropriate points from the lists.

  • Analog Input: Choose the Space Temperature point that applies to the AHU you are programming
  • Low Setpoint: Choose the Heating Setpoint you created for this AHU or a global Heating Setpoint for the database
  • High Setpoint: Choose the Cooling Setpoint you created for this AHU or a global Cooling Setpoint for the database

Cooling and Heating parameters need to be determined unless using Adaptive Optimal Start. The slope parameter is the number of minutes it takes the AHU to change the temperature by 1 degree. By looking at histories, you should be able to determine this information.

  • Do a History Graph on the AHU Binary Out and select the space temperature point to be graphed also.
  • Look at the time when the unit first comes on for the day. In cooling mode, you will see the binary point come on and the graph of the space temp will begin to go down.
  • By zooming in on that part of the graph, you should be able to tell exactly how long it takes to lower the temperature by 1 degree. But, you might want to see how long it takes to change by 3 or 4 degrees and take the average.
  • Do the same thing on a day when heat is required. Note: These slopes might have to be adjusted in the future.
  • Enter the slope times in the appropriate places on the Optimal Start setup screen.

Once you have saved the Optimal Start by exiting the setup screen, you now have to determine when to start the Optimal Start and add that to the schedule. If using Adaptive Optimal Start, the Slope will be determined for you, and your schedule can be adjusted accordingly.

  • Do a history on the Space Temperature point for a week, during the hottest and coolest times of the year.
  • You will be able to see how high or low the temperature got in relation to the setpoint. Subtract the lowest and highest numbers from the respective setpoints to get the maximum number of degrees change needed.
  • If you are using a “night Setback” or Unoccupied Setpoint to keep from getting too far away from the Occupied Setpoint, you can just subtract setpoint from the Unoccupied setpoint to get the maximum number.
  • Multiply this number by the larger of the two slopes determined earlier to get the amount of time the Optimal Start schedule should precede the regular schedule. (Maximum Slope, 30 Mins) X (Maximum Degrees, 5) = 2.5 Hours)
  • Open the Schedule for the point in question and you will notice that the first column of the schedule is labeled Optimal Start. You can edit this column or use the Graphical Editor by clicking the button.
  • In the Graphical Editor, click and hold the pointer at 2.5 hours before the beginning of the regular schedule, and then drag down and to the right to fill up the space (see figure below).

How does adaptive optimal start work?

  • Let up the mouse button and the line around the time period remains.
  • Click the Optimal Start button below and the time period will change to the color of the button. (Start, Optimal Start, and Stop sections are different shades, as are the corresponding buttons)
  • Exit the Schedule Editor and the Schedule will be saved.

You will need to monitor the operation by graphing some histories of the space temperature and Start/Stop points for the unit to see if any parameters need to be adjusted. There should be no need to shorten time periods during mild weather periods, because the schedule will not turn the unit on until it needs to.

*Very Important Note! If using CBAS points for setpoints, you have to “command” your setpoints or they will not work correctly, even if you have set the limits to a range of 1 degree on the point program screen. When you create a setpoint in CBAS and set the range on the setpoint (70-74), the value of the setpoint is 0 until you command it the first time. The value of the setpoint is 0 even though it will be displayed as the lower limit (70). This causes PIDs and Optimal Starts to not work. For example, a user created a setpoint and set it’s range from 74 to 74 because he never wants the setpoint to change. He then used this setpoint in an Optimal Start. The Optimal Start would come on at the beginning of the scheduled time period every day. The setpoint was showing a value of 74 but really it was 0. As soon as he commanded the setpoint to 74 it started to work.

How do you set overtime schedule?
Overtime schedules should be set for events that extend or alter an existing schedule. For example, a tenant requests lights and HVAC for employees working on late night projects during the week of 05/06/15, but the original schedule sets the lights and A/C on from 8:00AM to 6:00PM.

To program an overtime schedule, click on the point and click Program to enter the Point Program screen. Click Program Overtime Schedule to open the schedule graph window. This screen differs from the graphical editor for regular schedules in that you can choose a specific date rather than just a day of the week. The pre-set weekly schedule will be displayed in the schedule graph window. Here, you can add overtime schedules to the existing schedule.

To modify the existing schedule by adding overtime, first find the week you would like to adjust. Click Prev Week to find the week that falls before dates listed on the left side of the graph. Click Next Week to find the week following the dates listed.

  • Prev OT and Next OT: allow you to scroll through existing overtime schedules. After finding the date, click and drag the pointer to select a range of time to modify. Then choose from three options: OT OFF, OT Opt ON, and OT ON. All but the following buttons work the same way they do in the schedule graphical window, except that they are specific to the overtime schedule.
  • Clear All: Removes all overtime schedules for the selected point.
  • Clear OT: Removes a span of time selected but not yet designated as start, stop, or optimal start.
  • Text View: Lists all existing overtime schedules for the selected point
How do I create Holiday Schedules?
In the case of a large database with many VAVs, controllers could go lost for 20-30 minutes, while the BASnet channel is monopolized by the download process. A controller does not need a Schedule on it for a Download to be required. To edit Holidays, go to any point that has a schedule. Go to the Point Program screen and click on Schedule. Click Edit Holidays and make your changes.
How do you use optimal start?
Optimal Start
Optimal Start is used to anticipate the heating or cooling needs of a space by starting equipment early enough to reach setpoint just at the beginning of scheduled occupancy. The Optimal Start function in CBAS does this by calculating the difference between the Actual Temperature and the Occupied Temperature Setpoint. Based on a heating or cooling slope determined by the user, the unit is started early enough to bring the space temperature to the desired level. By doing this, you can avoid putting a heavy load on the equipment that would normally occur by starting right at the occupied time and playing catch-up. Under extreme conditions, playing catch-up could mean running at full capacity for several hours before reaching setpoint.

Depending on what version of CBAS you have (see Chapter 1: Getting Started), you will see something different when you open the Program Optimal Start screen. As of version 3.1.6, Adaptive Optimal Start and Internal Setpoints were added, making for a totally different setup. Both will be covered next.

This feature is available in 3.1.6, and requires a firmware upgrade on the controller hosting the Optimal Start point. The firmware is Revision 10.6 or higher, which will only work with CBAS version 3.1.6 or higher.

Optimal Start is a feature that can be found under the Optimal Start button in the Program screen of any Binary Output. Go there and you’ll find a screen similar to the screen to the right:

New Features in 3.1.6
How do you use optimal start?Optimal Start is programmed on a Binary Output that starts and stops an Air Handling Unit. There must be a weekly schedule programmed on the point to begin with, as well as a Low/Heating Setpoint and a High/Cooling Setpoint. These are software setpoints and can be programmed either individually for each AHU or globally for all AHUs in the database to use. The only other point needed is the space temperature.

If looking at an existing Optimal Start, the “Setpoint is a CBAS Point” box would be checked and your Setpoints listed. You can still do Optimal Start that way, but now you can enter your Heating and Cooling Setpoints right there on the Optimal Start screen. Just check the “Setpoint is internal number” box and enter your setpoint numbers. This makes setting up Optimal Starts on multiple controllers much easier than before.

Adaptive Optimal Start
When you check the box to “Allow OPTIMAL START to ADAPTIVELY adjust the Cooling and Heating Slope,” CBAS will save several parameters about the last 16 Heating and 16 Cooling Optimal Starts. The parameters saved are:

  1. Slope
  2. What the temperature difference was when the Optimal Start began.
  3. How long before the Schedule Start time did the Optimal Start begin. (Actually not stored but can be calculated from A and B above)
  4. Did the Optimal start reach it’s goal? If not, then what was the temperature difference at schedule start time?
  5. The day the Optimal Start ran.
  6. Was the unit off for more than 36 Hours when the Optimal Start first evaluated? (Tells you if it was after a Holiday or a Monday)

You can click on the “Show Adaptive History” button to see the data on the above parameters. Once you have enabled Adaptive Optimal Start, CBAS will determine the “slope”, or amount of time required to change the temperature by 1 degree, and adjust on a daily basis.

The following applies to versions prior to 3.1.6:
How do you use optimal start?Once these points are programmed, go to the Point Program Screen of the point containing the AHU schedule. Click the Program Optimal Start button to get the setup screen. (Pre-3.1.6 screen shown)

Click on the buttons next to Analog Input, Low Setpoint, and High Setpoint, and then select the appropriate points from the lists.

  • Analog Input: Choose the Space Temperature point that applies to the AHU you are programming
  • Low Setpoint: Choose the Heating Setpoint you created for this AHU or a global Heating Setpoint for the database
  • High Setpoint: Choose the Cooling Setpoint you created for this AHU or a global Cooling Setpoint for the database

Cooling and Heating parameters need to be determined unless using Adaptive Optimal Start. The slope parameter is the number of minutes it takes the AHU to change the temperature by 1 degree. By looking at histories, you should be able to determine this information.

  • Do a History Graph on the AHU Binary Out and select the space temperature point to be graphed also.
  • Look at the time when the unit first comes on for the day. In cooling mode, you will see the binary point come on and the graph of the space temp will begin to go down.
  • By zooming in on that part of the graph, you should be able to tell exactly how long it takes to lower the temperature by 1 degree. But, you might want to see how long it takes to change by 3 or 4 degrees and take the average.
  • Do the same thing on a day when heat is required. Note: These slopes might have to be adjusted in the future.
  • Enter the slope times in the appropriate places on the Optimal Start setup screen.

Once you have saved the Optimal Start by exiting the setup screen, you now have to determine when to start the Optimal Start and add that to the schedule. If using Adaptive Optimal Start, the Slope will be determined for you, and your schedule can be adjusted accordingly.

  • Do a history on the Space Temperature point for a week, during the hottest and coolest times of the year.
  • You will be able to see how high or low the temperature got in relation to the setpoint. Subtract the lowest and highest numbers from the respective setpoints to get the maximum number of degrees change needed.
  • If you are using a “night Setback” or Unoccupied Setpoint to keep from getting too far away from the Occupied Setpoint, you can just subtract setpoint from the Unoccupied setpoint to get the maximum number.
  • Multiply this number by the larger of the two slopes determined earlier to get the amount of time the Optimal Start schedule should precede the regular schedule. (Maximum Slope, 30 Mins) X (Maximum Degrees, 5) = 2.5 Hours)
  • Open the Schedule for the point in question and you will notice that the first column of the schedule is labeled Optimal Start. You can edit this column or use the Graphical Editor by clicking the button.
  • In the Graphical Editor, click and hold the pointer at 2.5 hours before the beginning of the regular schedule, and then drag down and to the right to fill up the space (see figure below).
  • Let up the mouse button and the line around the time period remains.
  • Click the Optimal Start button below and the time period will change to the color of the button. (Start, Optimal Start, and Stop sections are different shades, as are the corresponding buttons)
  • Exit the Schedule Editor and the Schedule will be saved.

You will need to monitor the operation by graphing some histories of the space temperature and Start/Stop points for the unit to see if any parameters need to be adjusted. There should be no need to shorten time periods during mild weather periods, because the schedule will not turn the unit on until it needs to.

*Very Important Note! If using CBAS points for setpoints, you have to “command” your setpoints or they will not work correctly, even if you have set the limits to a range of 1 degree on the point program screen. When you create a setpoint in CBAS and set the range on the setpoint (70-74), the value of the setpoint is 0 until you command it the first time. The value of the setpoint is 0 even though it will be displayed as the lower limit (70). This causes PIDs and Optimal Starts to not work. For example, a user created a setpoint and set it’s range from 74 to 74 because he never wants the setpoint to change. He then used this setpoint in an Optimal Start. The Optimal Start would come on at the beginning of the scheduled time period every day. The setpoint was showing a value of 74 but really it was 0. As soon as he commanded the setpoint to 74 it started to work.

When programming users in CBAS, what do all of those check boxes mean?
User Permissions

Checked boxes are user permissions. They control what menu items the user has permission to see, what they can control, and what they can change. When a box is checked, the user has permission to access that point in CBAS.

What are the mobile device addresses for sending CBAS alarms?
For Mobile Phones:
Provider Device Address Example
AT&T Your Number 000000000@txt.att.net
T-Mobile Your Number 000000000@tmomail.net
Verizon Your Number 000000000@vtext.com
Sprint Your Number 000000000@messaging.sprintpcs.com
     
For Email:
Provider Device Address Example
Microsoft Your Email Address youremail@outlook.com
Gmail Your Email Address youremail@gmail.com
Yahoo! Your Email Address youremail@yahoo.com
How do I program a Computrols Binary Board?
The Binary Board (BB) contains 8 Binary Output points (single pole dry contact) with built-in relays and wire terminals for normally open (NO) or normally closed (NC) applications. Like most of our other controllers, the brain board is easily removable from the terminal board, so no rewiring is required when replacing a defective BB. It comes with large screw terminals for easy termination. RS485 address is set using two rotary dials, with a range of 1-99.

The BB was originally intended for use in Access Control Elevator situations, where the card holder swipes their card in the elevator in order to push buttons for the floors they have access to. There would be a BB point allotted to each button in each elevator car. When the card is swiped, the points are commanded ON by Interlock and the buttons are enabled.

The BB can also be used to add Binary Outputs to an existing 8X, 16X, 32X and 64X, as long as there is an available RS485 port. The controller communicates on the “OPTO22 on Controller” channel type, so the points on the BB would reside in the database of the Host Controller. Because of that, the points would seem just like additional points on the Host Controller.

Either way you use the BB, Access Control or HVAC, the points can be configured 3 different ways: Binary Output, Momentary Output, or Analog Output (pulse).

Binary Output: When commanded ON, the contact stays closed until commanded OFF. Whether wired to NO or NC terminals, you can switch the contacts on the program screen of each point. Switching contacts will make a NO into a NC.

Momentary Output: When commanded ON, the contact stays closed for the number of seconds entered on the Point Program screen. (minimum .1 to 25 seconds maximum)

Analog Output: When commanded to a numerical value, the contact stays closed for that many seconds.

The Computrols Handheld programmer (HH) can be used to override the points for field testing purposes. When you plug in the HH to the terminal on the BB, you must press Enter, then 1 to command. Press the numbers 1-8 on the keypad to toggle the points ON and OFF. Points will remain in the overridden state until the HH is disconnected, then after 10 seconds will return to the state commanded to in CBAS.

Since the points of the BB are “on controller” you can also override the points from a HH connected to the host controller. To do that, go to the 1=Hardware section and scroll/page down to the point then press Select and follow on-screen instructions. The points will remain in the overridden state and HH priority until commanded from CBAS.

There is no configuration done using the HH. All configuration is done in CBAS and downloads to the host controller, then the BB.